Research

Clinical Trials at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian Hosptial/Columbia University Medical Center

Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery – LABS. 
In response to the obesity epidemic, the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK) has allocated funds for research related to obesity.  NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is proud to be part of this NIH-funded consortium of six clinical centers and a data coordinating center — which work together with the NIH to plan, develop, and conduct clinical, epidemiological, and behavioral research in bariatric surgery.

The grant will provide our center with $2 million dollars of funding over five years. Principal investigator Paul Berk, MD will head the team at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center with key collaborators, Alfons Pomp, MD, Barry Inabnet, MD and Marc Bessler, MD.

For more information, please download: LABS Brochure

or visit: www.edc.gsph.pitt.edu/labs/public


Brinker Trial Protocol # 0604-372
This protocol is concerned with studying the effect of reinforcement of stapling techniques with an absorbable membrane on the reduction of complications of laparoscopic procedures in gastric surgery, including weight loss surgery. With reinforcements, we hypothesized that leaks and bleeding will be reduced dramatically making obesity surgery much safer. [more]

Contact: Gladys Strain, PhD
Clinical Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
(212) 746-5294


A Research Study of Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding Surgery for Patients Who Do Not Meet Criteria For Standard Weight Loss Surgery.
If you are 60-100 pounds overweight, you may be eligible for a weight loss surgery. Even if have been told you do not weigh enough, you may qualify for our study. The cost of surgery (Approx. $12,000) will not be covered by insurance. This study is open to individuals 18-65 yrs, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) 30-40. [more]

Contact: Amna Daud, MD, MPH
Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia
(212) 342-0085


Data Collection Project for Weight Loss Surgery Protocol# 1103-029
Data collection is performed on all consenting weight loss surgery patients. This study looks at all the pre-operative, operative and post-operative factors that could influence a positive outcome after weight loss surgery. [more]

Contact: Gladys Strain, PhD
Clinical Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
(212) 746-5294


Effects of Bariatric Surgery on the Level of Hormones Involved in Skeletal Metabolism and Appetite
The purposes of this study are to determine if surgery for obesity interferes with the absorption of calcium and vitamin D and whether there are any changes in skeletal health following surgery. The study will also determine whether levels of hormones that regulate body weight are changed after surgery. This study is open to patients seeking surgical treatment (LAP-BAND® and Gastric Bypass) to help lose weight and have no other serious medical condition that might make the surgery unsafe. [more]

Contact: Amna Daud, MD, MPH
Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia
(212) 342-0085


The Effects of Weight Loss Prior to Surgery on the Complications of Bariatric Surgery Protocol #1103-030
Patients are encouraged in this program to have nutritional intervention and healthy lifestyle behaviors to prevent weight gain and promote weight loss prior to bariatric surgery. A similar group of patients are followed who did not participate in the program but had weight loss surgery. A statistical analysis of the possible effect on length of hospital stay and complications for six months after surgery will be completed. [more]

Contact: Gladys Strain, PhD
Clinical Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
(212) 746-5294


A Clinical Study to Evaluate the Efficacy of Banded Versus Standard Gastric Bypass for Weight Loss in Patient with Malignant Obesity
This is a prospective randomized and double blind trial to evaluate weight loss as well as complications in patients with malignant obesity, who are randomly assigned standard treatment with non-Banded Gastric Bypass or with Banded Gastric Bypass (the experimental procedure). This study is open to patients with malignant obesity, BMI 50 or greater (approximately 200 or more pounds over their ideal body weight). [more]

Contact: Amna Daud, MD, MPH
Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia
(212) 342-0085


Weight Loss Surgery and its Effects on Bone Metabolism Protocol #0804-463
Few studies looking at the effects of weight loss surgery on bone metabolism are available and none have been conducted to compare procedures. Patients eligible for weight loss surgery procedures may participate in studies of bone turnover and density with the support of the General Clinical Research Center at Cornell. Participating subjects will have an assessment of their calcium intake prior to surgery and be followed in regard to their prescribed supplement use after surgery. Markers of vitamin D status and bone metabolism will be studied in the blood and urine and measures of bone density will be followed for a year after surgery. [more]

Contact: Gladys Strain, PhD
Clinical Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
(212) 746-5294


A Gene Expression and Metabolic Profile of Weight Loss: Studies of Patients Following Gastric Bypass Surgery # JFN-0385-0404, Rockefeller University
We are recruiting patients to be followed at Rockefeller University during the weight loss process. Metabolic evaluations and genetic studies will be done in hospital and ambulatory as out patients prior to and following gastric bypass surgery for a 15 month duration after surgery. These studies include fat biopsy, metyrapone testing, hunger evaluations, immunology testing, and studies at St. Lukesí Obesity Research Center for body composition and resting energy expenditure. [more]

Contact: Gladys Strain, PhD
Clinical Research Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
(212) 746-5294

 
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Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons Weill Medical College of Cornell University