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Return to On Our Radar: Treatments for Our Children's Deadliest Illness Overview

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On Our Radar: Treatments for Our Children's Deadliest Illness

NEW YORK (Mar 1, 2012)

Anne Moscona, M.D.
Anne Moscona, M.D.

Anne Moscona, M.D., is on a mission.

"Respiratory infections like the croup, bronchiolitis and pneumonia kill more children under the age of five worldwide than anything else," says Dr. Moscona, Professor of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Vice Chair for Research, Department of Pediatrics, and Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at NewYork-Presbyterian/Phyllis and David Komansky Center for Children's Health.

"The most vulnerable children – those born prematurely, or with asthma or heart disease – are the ones who suffer the most and die most frequently," she says.

Dr. Moscona and her colleague at Weill Cornell, Matteo Porotto, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology in Pediatrics, are identifying ways to block viruses from getting into lung cells, which is "opening up a new range of possibilities for how we can prevent and cure these infections in children."

"I'm passionate about being able to advance what we can do for children," says Dr. Moscona. "Why do we have to just watch and wait and see if a child can cope with and recover from these very serious illnesses? We need treatments. We need prevention and we need cures. That's what we're working on."

"Weill Cornell has opened up the horizons of our research. The collaborations, the potential for doing interdisciplinary work, for working with investigators at Cornell University in Ithaca – this all happens in a seamless way. It has made everything we have discovered possible. It has allowed us to take our research from the idea stage, to the very basic science, to a point where I believe that in a few years we will be applying this to prevent infections in children."

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