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NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center Physician-Scientists Present at American College of Cardiology's 57th Annual Scientific Session

NEW YORK (Mar 27, 2008)

Physician-scientists from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center will present their latest research findings at the American College of Cardiology's 57th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago, March 29 to April 1. Among the most significant presentations are the following:

  • Drug-Eluting Stents Versus Bare-Metal Stents for Transplant Allograft Vasculopathy

Dr. Jeffrey Moses, Director of the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy and director of the Cardiac Catheterization Lab at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Heart transplant patients are more vulnerable to accelerated arteriosclerosis in their transplanted heart than the general population. In one of the largest studies of its kind, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia researchers found that drug-eluting stents were able to better keep arteries open and prevent narrowing than bare-metal stents. However, mortality rates for interventions were equal.

  • The Impact of Mandatory Angiographic Follow-up on the One-Year Clinical and Angiographic Results From Endeavor IV: A Randomized Comparison of the Endeavor Drug (ABT-578) Eluting Stent System vs. Taxus in De Novo Native Coronary Lesions

Dr. Martin B. Leon, Associate director of the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He is founder and chairman emeritus of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation in New York City.

This presentation will look at follow-up using angiograms and clinical outcomes on patients in the Endeavor IV study, which compares the Endeavor drug-eluting stent with the Taxus drug-eluting stent. The results indicate that clinical follow-up may be more meaningful in determining the true patient value of drug-eluting stents in preventing restenosis, the closing or narrowing of the previously-opened artery.

  • Safety and Effectiveness of Bivalirudin in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Angioplasty: The HORIZONS AMI Trial

    Impact of Baseline Renal Function on the Safety and Effectiveness of Bivalirudin in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Angioplasty: The HORIZONS AMI Trial

    Impact of Advanced Age on the Safety and Effectiveness of Bivalirudin in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Angioplasty: The HORIZONS AMI Trial

    Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on the Safety and Effectiveness of Bivalirudin in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Angioplasty: The HORIZONS AMI Trial

    Is Diabetes a Risk Factor for Restenosis and Adverse Clinical Outcomes After Paclitaxel-Eluting Stent Implantation: Pooled Analysis of the TAXUS IV and TAXUS V Trials

Dr. Gregg W. Stone, Director of Cardiovascular Research and Education at the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He is also chairman of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation in New York City.

Dr. Stone will present new findings from the HORIZONS AMI trial, which is evaluating the drug bivalirudin for heart attack patients undergoing angioplasty. Last year, investigators reported that the therapy reduces risk of death compared with the standard treatment. New findings look at several subsets, including older patients and patients with diabetes, finding bivalirudin also effective for these groups.

In addition, Dr. Stone will present findings from the TAXUS trials looking at the risk of restenosis and other negative outcomes in patients with diabetes with the Taxus drug-eluting stent.

Columbia University Medical Center

Columbia University Medical Center provides international leadership in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research, in medical and health sciences education, and in patient care. The medical center trains future leaders and includes the dedicated work of many physicians, scientists, nurses, dentists, and public health professionals at the College of Physicians & Surgeons, the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, the School of Nursing, the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and allied research centers and institutions. Established in 1767, Columbia's College of Physicians & Surgeons was the first institution in the country to grant the M.D. degree. Among the most selective medical schools in the country, the school is home to the largest medical research enterprise in New York State and one of the largest in the country. For more information, please visit www.cumc.columbia.edu.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia, located in New York City, is one of the leading academic medical centers in the world, comprising the teaching hospital NewYork-Presbyterian and its academic partner, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia provides state-of-the-art inpatient, ambulatory and preventive care in all areas of medicine, and is committed to excellence in patient care, research, education and community service. NewYork-Presbyterian, which is among U.S.News & World Report's top 10 hospitals nationally, also comprises NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center and its academic affiliate, Weill Cornell Medical College.

Contact

Bryan Dotson
Phone: (212) 305-5587.
brd9005@nyp.org
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