Find A Physician

Return to NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program Overview

More on NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program

Hospital News

Return to NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program Overview

More on NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program

Health Library

Return to NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program Overview

More on NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program

Research and Clinical Trials

Return to NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program Overview

More on NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program

Clinical Services

Return to NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program Overview

More on NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program

NewYork-Presbyterian Launches Awareness Campaign for Interpreter Services Program

58 Onsite Interpreters, 120 Languages

NEW YORK (Mar 17, 2006)

As the largest hospital in the world's most diverse city, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital cares for patients from dozens of countries every day, including many non-English speakers. The Hospital, which has long provided interpreter services to these patients, has launched an initiative called "We Speak Your Language" to increase awareness of the availability of these services.

NewYork-Presbyterian offers an extensive language assistance program for its patients, including more than 58 onsite interpreters and other interpretation services available for up to 120 languages. In 2005, the Hospital provided more than 115,000 interpretations in 72 different languages all cost-free to the patient.

"Good communication is vital to good medicine. NewYork-Presbyterian goes the extra mile to ensure that every patient's voice is understood," says Dr. Herbert Pardes, president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

Hospital interpreters, both those onsite and those available by telephone, must meet the highest standard for fluency, knowledge of medical terms, interpreting skills, and code of ethics. They also receive cultural-competency training.

As part of the new initiative, large signs, with a message in all the most frequently encountered languages used in the Hospital and its community, will inform non-English-speaking patients about the availability of interpreter services. Additionally, Hospital staff will carry "I Speak" cards that display miniature versions of the larger signs.

NewYork-Presbyterian has already met the new New York State requirements for a Language Assistance Program (LAP) to ensure appropriate communication with patients about treatment, informed consent, discharge plans, and health-care proxy. The new requirements are set to take effect in June 2006.

"We seek to exceed the new State requirement, creating a center of excellence for interpreter services and setting the standard for quality interpretation," says Rick Evans, director of volunteer and patient-centered services at NewYork-Presbyterian.

NewYork-Presbyterian is also advocating for the standardization of training requirements and a certification process for medical interpreters. Additionally, the Hospital is lobbying for reimbursement for interpreter services. Every year, NewYork-Presbyterian spends more than $2.5 million on interpreter services. Currently, 11 states reimburse hospitals for this service.

Cultural Competency Training
Complementing its longstanding commitment to interpreter services, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has also provided cultural competency training to its employees. The required course, called "Creating an Oasis of Respect," teaches an understanding of cultural differences within the health-care setting, emphasizing compassionate and effective communication.

The course employs video and class exercises to demonstrate the often unconscious biased assumptions people make in the workplace, as well as ways to overcome these biases.

"It is vital that clinicians establish empathetic communication with patients of different cultures in order to understand how their beliefs or experiences may affect their treatment," says Dr. Emilio Carrillo, vice president of community health development at NewYork-Presbyterian. "For example, in some cultures, open-heart surgery is anathema to religious beliefs. In cases like this, the clinician shouldn't necessarily persuade the patient he's wrong, but rather negotiate a treatment plan that respects his beliefs while explaining the clinician's methods and goals."

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital based in New York City is the nation's largest not-for-profit, non-sectarian hospital, with 2,344 beds. It provides state-of-the-art inpatient, ambulatory and preventive care in all areas of medicine at five major centers: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Allen Pavilion and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Westchester Division. One of the largest and most comprehensive health-care institutions in the world, the Hospital is committed to excellence in patient care, research, education and community service. It ranks among the top 10 in U.S.News & World Report's guide to "America's Best Hospitals," has the greatest number of physicians listed in New York magazine's "Best Doctors" issue, and is included among Solucient's top 15 major teaching hospitals. The Hospital has academic affiliations with two of the nation's leading medical colleges: Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Contact

Office of Public Affairs
Phone: (212) 305-5587.
pr@nyp.org
  • Bookmark
  • Print


eNewsletters
Top of page