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Colloid Cyst

The most common tumor located within the third ventricle is the colloid cyst. This benign tumor can cause a blockage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), leading toward increased intracranial pressure and potentially death.

The definitive method for treating colloid cysts is surgical removal. Prior to the advent of endoscopic neurosurgery, the removal of colloid cysts relied on an extensive open surgical procedure achieved by way of a craniotomy, an open procedure which requires removal of a portion of the skull. Because of the deep and central location of these benign tumors the standard surgical procedures are usually lengthy and have significant risk.

Highly refined endoscopes with a wide array of compatible instruments allow complete removal of colloid cysts through a much less invasive technique in a fraction of the time.

Endoscopic neurosurgery has greatly simplified the management of many intracranial ailments in adults and children. Similar in concept to other endoscopic surgery, intracranial neuroendoscopy reduces the surgical morbidity, shortens the hospital stay, and minimizes the cosmetic concerns associated with many major neurosurgical conditions. In general, neuroendoscopy does not require large incisions on the scalp, removal of skull flaps, or extensive dissection through brain tissue. In the past several years the technological advancements in endoscope design have been substantial. A reduced size, improved resolution, and brighter illumination of the endoscope has allowed the benefits of endoscopic surgery to be applied in neurosurgery.

Colloid Cyst Resection

The procedure is performed through a small incision (approximately 1 inch) behind the hairline. From this site, the endoscope is inserted into the ventricular compartment of the brain and then navigated toward the tumor surface. The wall of the tumor is then coagulated with an electrical current and the cyst is then opened with sharp dissection. A variety of suction catheters are then used to empty the contents of the cyst. The cyst wall is then removed and any remnants are destroyed using an electrical current. The endoscope is then removed and the wound is closed. The procedure averages 45 minutes-1 hour and patients can return home within 1-2 days.

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