Click on a letter of the alphabet below to view a list of procedures:

G

Gastric Bypass (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass RGB)

Gastric bypass, also known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is the most common and successful weight loss surgery in the US with acceptable risks and side effects. It is both malabsorptive (changing the way the digestive system works) and restrictive (severely reducing the size of the stomach to hold less food, with digestive functions remaining intact).

In this procedure, the surgeon creates a small stomach pouch in the top of the stomach that forms the new stomach and restricts food intake. The surgeon then creates a small opening, or stoma, in the pouch and attaches that opening to a section of the small intestine, which forms the "bypass" of most of the stomach and a small section of the intestine. This surgery can result in two-thirds of extra weight loss within two years. This procedure may be performed with a laparoscope rather than through an open incision.

Gastric Manometry

This test measures electrical and muscular activity in the stomach. The physician passes a thin tube down the patient's throat into the stomach. This tube contains a wire that takes measurements of the electrical and muscular activity of the stomach as it digests foods and liquids. This helps show how the stomach is working, and if there is any delay in digestion.

GI (gastrointestinal) Series (Upper/Lower)

Upper GI (gastrointestinal) Series

Also called a barium swallow, this diagnostic test examines the organs of the upper part of the digestive system: the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first section of the small intestine). a fluid called barium (a metallic, chemical, chalky, liquid used to coat the inside of organs so that they will show up on an x-ray) is swallowed. X-rays are then taken to evaluate the digestive organs. An upper GI with a small bowel follow through may be used to diagnose Crohn's disease.

Lower GI (gastrointestinal) Series

Also called a barium enema, this procedure examines the rectum, the large intestine, and the lower part of the small intestine. a fluid called barium (a metallic, chemical, chalky, liquid used to coat the inside of organs so that they will show up on an x-ray) is given into the rectum as an enema. An x-ray of the abdomen shows strictures (narrowed areas), obstructions (blockages) and other problems.