Find A Physician

Return to Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents Overview

More on Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents

Newsroom

Return to Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents Overview

More on Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents

Research and Clinical Trials

Return to Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents Overview

More on Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents

Clinical Services

Return to Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents Overview

More on Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents

Lap-Band Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Adolescents

New York (May 15, 2009)

Person steps on scale

Childhood obesity has risen dramatically in the past several decades. A serious medical condition, childhood obesity is particularly troubling because the additional weight can lead to health problems that were once confined to adults, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. When conventional weight loss approaches fail, help is available with laparoscopic gastric banding surgery. According to findings by physician-scientists at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital, teenagers' obesity-related medical complications improved just six months after laparoscopic gastric banding surgery.

About the Lap-Band Study

A small group of extremely obese teenagers participating in the study who received the minimally invasive surgery, also called the Lap-Band procedure, lost an average of 20 pounds after six months. They also had significant improvements in abdominal fat, triglyceride measurements (levels of fat in the blood) and blood sugar levels as measured by hemoglobin A1c – all risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. The patients' liver function and a measure of immune response also improved.

"Extremely obese teenagers have obesity-related health problems, particularly diabetes and increased cardiovascular risk," said lead author Ilene Fennoy, MD, Medical Director of the Center for Adolescent Bariatric Surgery and a pediatric endocrinologist at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital. "Laparoscopic gastric banding, which has been shown to be a safe and effective way to lose weight, now offers the possibility of reducing obesity's medical complications. Until recently, these young patients have had to rely primarily on non-surgical methods or higher-risk surgeries to lose weight, and few of these treatments have succeeded in achieving major weight loss or greatly improving their overall health."

The Lap-Band Procedure

The Lap-Band procedure, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for adults but not yet in teenagers, involves making the stomach smaller without staples. Instead, a band is place around the upper part of the stomach, creating a small pouch that restricts food intake. The surgeon implants a small access port, and after the surgery the doctor periodically adjusts the gastric band by inflating or deflating a saline-filled balloon that lies inside the band. If desired, the procedure is reversible. NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital is one of three sites in the nation approved to study this procedure in teens.

The study, which is part of the multidisciplinary FDA-approved Lap-Band Trial for Teens being performed at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center, followed 14 adolescents–six boys and eight girls–between the ages of 14 and 17 who were, on average, 174 pounds overweight. Patients received dietary counseling and encouragement to exercise, both before and after surgery.

Preventing Lifelong Physical and Emotional Problems

"Children who are obese are at risk for developing lifelong physical and emotional problems," said Jeffrey L. Zitsman, MD, Director of the Division of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital. "These include Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, trouble breathing, difficulty sleeping, and degenerative joint disorders. Teenagers who have weight problems tend to have lower self-esteem and can develop depression, anxiety and other psychological issues. Studies also show that the majority of children and adolescents who are obese remain obese as adults. Our staff is dedicated to helping adolescents who are obese lose weight when conventional methods have been unsuccessful. Our surgical team has extensive experience in laparoscopic bariatric surgery and long-term management of patients in a supportive and caring environment."

Faculty Contributing to this Article:

Ilene Fennoy, MD, Medical Director, Center for Adolescent Bariatric Surgery, and Director, Maxcor POWER (Obesity) Clinic, NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital, and Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Jeffrey L. Zitsman, MD, Director of the Division of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital, and Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

  • Bookmark
  • Print

    Find a Doctor

Click the button above or call
1 877 NYP WELL


eNewsletters


Newsroom


Clinical Services


Top of page